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Biomet
 
 

Shoulder Pain / Shoulder Replacement Products
Comprehensive Reverse Shoulder Replacement

Patient Risk Information


 

Reverse Shoulder Replacement
If you are a potential candidate for reverse shoulder replacement, you may be suffering from pain as a result of a previous rotator cuff tear. A cuff-tear causes your shoulder joint to lose much of its natural support, leading to increased instability. Often, this results in the normal shoulder becoming destabilized, and moving out of socket completely. Over time, this instability leads to bone-on-bone contact, moderate to severe pain, and extremely limited mobility.

Rotator Cuff Tear
If you are a potential candidate for reverse shoulder replacement, you may be suffering from pain as a result of a previous rotator cuff tear. A cuff-tear causes your shoulder joint to lose much of its natural support, leading to increased instability. Often, this results in the shoulder becoming unstable, and moving out of socket completely. Over time, this instability may lead to bone-on-bone contact, moderate to severe pain, and extremely limited mobility.



Comprehensive Reverse Shoulder Replacement
For this implant, surgeons don't replace the entire shoulder, they only replace the damaged bone and cartilage at the ends of the bones. Reverse shoulder replacement has revolutionized the treatment of rotator cuff tears, by reversing the original anatomy of the shoulder. The Comprehensive Reverse Shoulder Replacement:

  • Is designed so that the ball is attached to the shoulder blade (scapula) and the socket is placed on top of the upper-arm bone (humerus)
  • Enables the deltoid muscle to raise the arm

Is it right for me?

Only an orthopedic surgeon can determine what treatment is appropriate for an individual patient. Generally, reverse shoulder replacement is indicated for those who:

  • Have extreme pain that is not rectified by traditional methods of shoulder pain relief
  • Have a shoulder joint or shoulder replacement that has a grossly deficient rotator cuff with severe arthropathy
  • Are anatomically and structurally suited to receive the implants and have a functional deltoid muscle
  • Need primary, fracture, or revision total shoulder replacement for the relief of pain and significant disability due to gross rotator cuff deficiency

Possible Adverse Effects and Risks
The use of reverse shoulder prosthesis in patients with a deficient rotator cuff could increase the risk of component loosening. Misalignment of the components or inaccurate implantation can lead to excessive wear and/or failure of the implant or procedure.

While uncommon, complications can occur during and after surgery. Complications include, but are not limited to, infection, implant breakage, nerve damage, and fracture. Any of these complications may require additional surgery. Although implant surgery is extremely successful in most cases, some patients still experience pain and stiffness. No implant will last forever, and the patient's post-surgical activities can affect the longevity of the implant. Be sure to discuss these and other risks with your surgeon.

Biomet is a manufacturer of orthopedic implants and does not practice medicine. Only an orthopedic surgeoncan determine what treatment is appropriate. Individual results of total joint replacement may vary. The life of any implant will depend on your weight, age, activity level, and other factors. For more information on risks, warnings, and possible adverse effects, see the Patient Risk Information section found within Biomet.com. Always ask your doctor if you have any questions regarding your particular condition or treatment options.


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